CMOS Rolling Shutter Removal – Plugin Shootout!

I’m getting away with whip pans like these. Or just about, anyway. That said, I’m not going to bore you with an explanation of what rolling shutter is. Chances are that – before you reached this blog – you already went through the torture of a few hundred posts and videos of everyone else demonstrating rolling shutter – without the slightest suggestion of a good CMOS skew and jello removal tool. You can relax now, for I’m going to show you a comparison between the five filters that are available…

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Graduated ND filters for bright skies

Ed. note: This was published in 2013 when the DSLR craze was in full force and sensors with excellent dynamic range weren’t as common as they are now.¬† If you’ve ever shot a video with a bright sky in the top of your shot and dark foliage below, you’ve undoubtedly experienced the problems of exposing an image for such a situation – and it usually winds up with your clouds blown out to bright white in order not to underexpose the rest. Since it is difficult – and often impossible…

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Aperture Flicker: Why you should have a manual aperture zoom lens…

…and why electronic, variable aperture zoom lenses are a poor choice for DSLR filmmaking: Aperture flicker is a phenomenon of zoom lenses with variable apertures at the open end. For the purposes of this explanation, let us consider the following Canon EF 28-135mm zoom lens – it will run open as low as f/3.5 when at 28mm, but will close to f/5.6 when the focal length increases to 135mm. As the lens has an electrically controlled aperture built into the body, the lens will automatically stop down from f/3.5 to…

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Mounting Nikon lenses on the Canon 5D Mark II, EOS, M43 and others

Amongst the trends of DSLR videomakers is to mount older, manual Nikon/Nikkor F-mount lenses (amongst others) to the front of their Canon EOS cameras. It is a good trend; one that keeps you from the aperture flicker nightmares described in yesterday’s post. These older Nikons are also known for their buttery smooth, long-throw focus rings, as opposed to the ultra-minimal throw of most Canon EF lenses (those that are not outrageously priced, anyway). Nikon’s Series E 50mm f/1.4 (with Nikon-EOS adapter) and Nikkor 28mm f/2.8 – two fantastic lenses. For…

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Counterfeit Canon EOS rear end caps: How to avoid them (and why should I care?).

As we all know, there are various easy-to-manufacture Canon bits out there that are counterfeited. Some work, others don’t. Lens caps are amongst the most popular of these ripoffs, though most copies are honest enough to strike the Canon logo from the back end. Nevertheless, there are a few Chinese industrial thieves out there who make copies bearing the Canon logo, the photo above being one of them. Given that whoever ripped this off was armed with an AutoCAD designer and at least one injection molding machine, it should perform…

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